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July 4 2005

Idlewild Log Entries

August 12, 2006
August 8, 2006
July 30, 2006
July 17, 2006
July 8, 2006
June 25, 2006
June 21, 2006
June 11, 2006
May 9, 2006
April 21 2006
March 28, 2006
March 12, 2006
February 12, 2006
January 30, 2006
January 16, 2006
January 3, 2006
December 27, 2005
December 11, 2005
November 29, 2005
November 16, 2005
October 22, 2005
October 11, 2005
October 1, 2005
September 27 2005
September 14 2005
September 13 2005
September 12 2005
September 11 2005
September 10 2005
September 5 2005
August 26 2005
August 19 2005
August 8 2005
August 3 2005
July 25 2005
July 23 2005
July 15 2005
July 4 2005
June 30 2005
June 25 2005
June 16 2005
June 11 2005
June 9 2005
May 22 2005
April 14 2005
March 2005
October 5 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
October 2003
July 2003

The Liard River flows into Mackenzie River from the west.  It is quite muddy and the Mackenzie is still clear from Great Slave Lake.  After a few miles they are both muddy.  The Peace was a good sized river when we started but with the addition of the, Smoky, Athabasca, Liard and the watersheds of the 2 big lakes, plus numerous smaller rivers and creeks, we now have a very big flow of water.  We have had a primarily rock and gravel bottom from Great Slave Lake to Norman Wells.  This will apparently change soon to mostly sand.  The Nahanni Range was the first mountain range with several more along the way.   A large portion of the area has been  burned over in the last 10 years.  Little of this area is usable timber and the burn provides more good than harm in most cases.

On Thursday Alice Gray, Chip & Jodie  & Ryan & Scott Ingraham, and Kim & Mikayla & Trenton Lofstrom arrived after flying around the Nahanni River area for some sightseeing.  After a nice reunion most went fishing in the evening,  where all were happy and all caught a fish in the clear, shallow, red water of the Harris River.

July 1 we left Fort Simpson with most of the new crew sleeping.  We met the Norweta as they were returning from Inuvik with passengers.  They provide river cruises with a relatively small ship.  Right after that we were contacted by a man who is mapping the river for other disabled people using the river for recreation.   We also met some friends from Hines Creek making their way to Tuktoyaktuk from Fort Providence on a round trip.  Mierzewski’s are traveling faster so we expect to see them as they return.

We met another tug boat crew on the Shiela J. as it arrived into Fort Simpson and we later crossed paths down the river.  Mike Cooper, the skipper is third generation tugboat captain since his grandfather built their first tug in Fort Nelson and hauled equipment for the US army and the Canol project in 1942 from Ft. Nelson to Norman Wells.  Along the way we also met up with the Canadian Coast Guard Ship – Dumit, with a crew of 10.  We gave them a tour of our boat and then we got a great tour all over their ship.  The kids got picture pamphlets, water bottles, and cookies in their kitchen.  The Dumit was designed with a shallow draft for working on the river with a name that means “Pathfinder” in Inuit.  It is 160 feet long with 2250 hp.  Most of the time it maintains the navigational aids along the river like the buoys.

We stopped and explored the sleepy town of Tulida (Ft Norman) and did some fishing in the crystal clear, cold, Bear River.

At 20:30 July 3rd we were slowed by high wind rocking Vidar so anchored at mile 543.  The radio calling for a small craft warning until afternoon July 4.  We arrived in Norman Wells on July 4 and tied to a tug (NTCL Jock McNiven) at the public wharf.

Still me voyage

Norweta cruise ship

Cooper Barging

 

Jodie’s July 4

Flying – chartering a plane is fun!  Fringe benefits include you can pack lots of stuff and have a personal tour over Nahanni Range.  Kim flew the plane and Trenton learned how to pee in a bottle.  Kim nearly died of embarrassment but was laughing too hard.  Fishing – more fun!  All the kids caught fish but disappeared quickly at cleaning time.

On Friday Kim and Jodie along with Trenton and Mikayla swam in the North Nahanni River.  Warm water was a great treat.  Children learn what dish duty is as Grandma Gray reorganizes her berth (bedroom).  We also found out that the Idlewild has plenty of room for 11 people.

We found another warm water creek on Saturday.  Ryan and Trenton explored it and of course were soaked quickly.  Napping and relaxing are the order of the day for the adults.  For children it is always play hard and laugh lots.  The sling shots were tried.


July 1 we left Fort Simpson with most of the new crew sleeping. We met the

Norweta as they were returning from Inuvik with passengers. They provide

river cruises with a relatively small ship. Right after that we were

contacted by a man who is mapping the river for other disabled people using

the river for recreation. We also met some friends from Hines Creek making

their way to Tuktoyaktuk from Fort Providence on a round trip. Mierzewski's

are traveling faster so we expect to see them as they return.

We met another tug boat crew on the Shiela J. as it arrived into Fort

Simpson and we later crossed paths down the river. Mike Cooper, the skipper

is third generation tugboat captain since his grandfather built their first

tug in Fort Nelson and hauled equipment for the US army and the Canol

project in 1942 from Ft. Nelson to Norman Wells. Along the way we also met

up with the Canadian Coast Guard Ship - Dumit, with a crew of 10. We gave

them a tour of our boat and then we got a great tour all over their ship.

The kids got picture pamphlets, water bottles, and cookies in their kitchen.

The Dumit was designed with a shallow draft for working on the river with a

name that means "Pathfinder" in Inuit. It is 160 feet long with 2250 hp.

Most of the time it maintains the navigational aids along the river like the

buoys.

We stopped and explored the sleepy town of Tulida (Ft Norman) and did some

fishing in the crystal clear, cold, Bear River.

At 20:30 July 3rd we were slowed by high wind rocking Vidar so anchored at

mile 543. The radio calling for a small craft warning until afternoon July

4. We arrived in Norman Wells on July 4 and tied to a tug (NTCL Jock

McNiven) at the public wharf.

Still me voyage

Norweta cruise ship

Cooper Barging